Browse articles by subject

Pages:<<first<<prev12345next>>last>>
Peace
The question facing Cambodia today is: How do you deal with the remnants of a regime which turned the country into the killing fields and now says 'We have defected'?
Gerald Pillay assesses one country's bold-and controversial-bid to come to terms with its past.
Last year the Cambodian government offered an amnesty to Ieng Sary, the leader of a faction of the Khmer Rouge. The issue raised great controversy. We reprint an abridged version of an article in the 'Phnom Penh Post' by the director of Cambodia's Institute of Human Rights, Kassie Neou.
For over 300 years the Quakers have been working for peace and acting as mediators. Campbell Leggat mines the experience of a group who have never been afraid to stand up to power or to listen at the deepest level.
Possibly Australia's most unconventional priest, John Smith is increasingly taking his message to his country's centres of power. He and his wife, Glena, talk to John Bond.
'The Railway Man by Eric Lomax, Cape £15.99; paperback Vintage £6.99
Yusuf Al-Azhari spent six years in solitary confinement as a political prisoner. Now he is helping to bring Somalia's warlords together. Michael Smith tells his story:
Women from around the world light a candle to launch a peace initiative with a difference. Mary Lean joined them in the mountain village of Caux, Switzerland.
Louise Diamond, Director of Peace Works, Washington DC, gives her impressions of the conference:
Because Japan has thought only about her own peace, values such as freedom, justice and order, which can be shared with other countries, have become secondary.
Pages:<<first<<prev12345next>>last>>

SEARCH OUR SITE